Services

DENTAL BONDING

Dental bonding is the most popular procedure for correcting small dental flaws such as:

  • Tooth decay (cavities)
  • Cracks
  • Gaps
  • Discoloration

Bondings are a mixture of glass or quartz filler in a resin medium that produces a tooth-colored filling. They are sometimes referred to as composites or filled resins. Composite fillings provide good durability and resistance to fracture in small-to-mid size restorations that need to withstand moderate chewing pressure. Less tooth structure is removed when the dentist prepares the tooth, and this may result in a smaller filling than that of an amalgam. Composites can also be “bonded” or adhesively held in a cavity, often allowing the dentist to make a more conservative repair to the tooth.

Dental bondings can be done in a single visit, and the procedure takes between 30 to 40 minutes per bonding.  The typical cost can range between $50 and $600 per tooth, and the cost can vary depending on the extent of work required and the type of insurance coverage.  Most insurers will cover some or most of the cost of bonding, and we can check on the details of coverage for you on your first appointment.

ADULT AND CHILD CLEANING

We all know that good oral hygiene keeps your teeth looking clean and shiny, but did you know that it’s also essential to your overall health? It’s true, poor oral hygiene can lead to a variety of dental and medical problems such as gum disease, infection, heart disease, stroke, and even diabetes.

That’s why the dental community at large recommend that teeth be cleaned professionally twice a year. Teeth cleaning is the removal of dental plaque and tartar in order to prevent cavities, gingivitis and gum disease. The average dental cleaning is a routine procedure that is rarely painful and takes about 45 minutes.

At Chantilly Dental, we specialize in and frequently perform a variety of dental cleaning procedures, from routine prophylasis cleaning to scaling and root planning, so you can rest assured that yours will be performed by a skilled and experienced medical professional.

We are dedicated to providing the highest standard of quality in all dental procedures to ensure our patients’ complete satisfaction. Using state-of-the-art dental technology, we have improved thousands of smiles, and we want to do the same for you. To schedule an appointment or a consultation, please contact us today.

ORAL CANCER SCREENING

Of the thousands of people who are diagnosed with oral cancer each year, two-thirds of the cases are found at the late stages of the disease. This is largely due to the fact that there is not a great level of awareness among the public of the symptoms and signs of oral cancer.

While smoking and alcohol consumption can cause oral cancer, heavy usage of both increases the risk exponentially. Symptoms of oral cancer can include:

  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Problems chewing
  • Sores in and around the mouth that last longer than two weeks
  • Small lesions or lumps, pale or dark colored, in the mouth area
  • A burning or pain in the location of a tumor
  • Red or white areas on the mouth’s soft tissues

At Chantilly Cosmetic & Family Dentistry we don’t just check for cavities, We have your health in mind. If you have any of the above symptoms, or any questions about something unusual in your mouth area, schedule a screening for oral cancer today.

DENTAL SEALANTS

Dental sealants act as a barrier, protecting the teeth against decay-causing bacteria. The sealants are usually applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth — premolars and molars where decay occurs most often.  This plastic resin bonds into the depressions and grooves (pits and fissures) of the chewing surfaces of back teeth. The sealant acts as a barrier, protecting enamel from plaque and acids.

Thorough brushing and flossing help remove food particles and plaque from smooth surfaces of teeth. But toothbrush bristles cannot reach all the way into the depressions and grooves to extract food and plaque. Sealants protect these vulnerable areas by “sealing out” plaque and food.

Sealants are easy for our dentist to apply, and it takes only a few minutes to seal each tooth. The teeth that will be sealed are cleaned. Then the chewing surfaces are roughened with an acid solution to help the sealant adhere to the tooth. The sealant is then ‘painted’ onto the tooth enamel, where it bonds directly to the tooth and hardens. Sometimes a special curing light is used to help the sealant harden.

As long as the sealant remains intact, the tooth surface will be protected from decay. Sealants hold up well under the force of normal chewing and usually last several years before a reapplication is needed. During your regular dental visits, our dentist will check the condition of the sealants and reapply them when necessary.

CROWNS

If you want a smile that’s your crowning glory, you may need a crown to cover a tooth and restore it to its normal shape and size. A crown can make your tooth stronger and improve its appearance.  While onlays and inlays cover the chewing surface of the tooth, and fillings cover the interior space of the tooth,crown covers the entire visible part of the tooth.

Sometimes it might be necessary to cover a tooth with a crown.  It can cover and support a tooth with a large filling when there isn’t enough tooth left. It can be used to attach a bridge, protect a weak tooth from breaking or restore one that’s already broken. A crown is a good way to cover teeth that are discolored or badly shaped. It’s also used to cover a dental implant.

BRIDGES

Having one or more missing teeth can have a serious effect not only on your smile, but also on your dental health. Specifically, missing teeth can cause:

  • Increased risk of periodontal disease
  • Increased risk of tooth decay
  • Loss of adjacent teeth
  • Speech disorder
  • A shift in the alignment of your teeth
  • Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ)

What Are Dental Bridges?

Like dental implants, dental bridges are used to replace missing a missing tooth, except bridges are supported by the teeth on either side called abutment teeth.

What Are the Benefits of Bridges?

Like many cosmetic dental procedures, placing bridges also serves a restorative purpose. A dental bridge will improve your ability to chew and speak as well as your smile. In a recent study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association, dental bridges were shown to dramatically reduce the risk of losing teeth that are adjacent to a missing tooth. In addition, dental bridges can help keep your jaw and face from changing shape, as they tend to do when a person has missing teeth.

What Types of Bridges Are There?

  • Cantilever bridges are used to replace a tooth that does not have supporting teeth on both sides of the affected area.
  • Maryland bonded bridges include artificial teeth and gums, and are held in place by a metal frame.
  • Traditional bridges are the most common, and literally bridge the gap of an empty tooth space by securing a false tooth using crowns on the teeth on either side.

How Are Dental Bridges Placed?

The procedure of installing a dental bridge is typically completed in two visits. First, your dentist will determine if you are a good candidate for a dental bridge. If you are, your teeth will need to be prepared by reshaping or reconstructing any badly decayed or damaged areas. Afterward, your dentist will take an impression of your teeth, which is then sent off to a lab where it is cast into a mold, and give you a temporary bridge to wear. On your second visit, this mold will be fitted to your teeth, and any necessary corrections or adjustments will be made on that same visit.

How Long Do Dental Bridges Last?

Dental bridges can last from 8 to 15 years and can last even longer if you maintain good oral hygiene by brushing and flossing regularly.

How Much Do Bridges Cost?

Depending on various factors such as the experience and skill level of the dentist and the type of bridge being fitted, dental bridges can cost anywhere from $300 to $1200 a tooth.

Are Bridges Covered By My Dental Insurance?

Dental bridges are typically partially covered by insurers.  Call us to find out exactly how much you will have to pay out of pocket.

IMPLANT CROWNS

An implant crown is the third piece of a dental implant.  Dental implants consist of three pieces – the implant, which attaches to the bone, the custom abutment, which is the part that is attached to the implant, and the crown, which is the tooth-looking portion placed securely over the abutment by cement or screw-retention.  Significantly stronger than bridges or dentures, an implant crown offers a single and permanent solution to a lost tooth. The implant is integrated into your jaw with a small titanium screw and over the course of several months naturally bonds with your mouth. Once the implant screw is bonded with your mouth, the implant crown is placed on top.  This procedure is relatively simple and is effective in almost all cases, so there’s no need to put off restoring that great smile.

 

 

IMPLANT DENTURES

Over time, as you wear your denture, you continually lose the boney structure that supports your soft tissues. Because your soft tissues actually make contact with your dentures, they too will start to recede with the bone, this will leave you in a continuous state of adjustment, discomfort, and difficulty with everyday functions like; speaking, chewing, and especially smiling.

Implant dentures solve these issues.  Implant dentures are a type of overdenture that is supported by and attached to implants.  They provide tremendous support and fixation so you can comfortably speak, chew, and smile.  They keep your upper and lower jaw bone from receding which prevents facial shape changes like the “shrunken” look.

An implant denture is used when a person doesn’t have any teeth in the jaw, but has enough bone in the jaw to support implants. They have special attachments that snap onto attachments on the implants.

ROOT CANAL TREATMENT

The pulp is the soft tissue that contains nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue. It lies within the tooth and extends from the crown of the tooth to the tip of the root in the bone of the jaws.

When the pulp is diseased or injured and can’t repair itself, it dies. The most common cause of pulp death is a cracked tooth or a deep cavity. Both of these problems can let germs (bacteria) enter the pulp. Germs can cause an infection inside the tooth. Left without treatment, pus builds up at the root tip, in the jawbone, forming a “pus-pocket” called an abscess. An abscess can cause damage to the bone around the teeth.  When the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result. Certain byproducts of the infection can injure your jaw bones. Without treatment, your tooth may have to be removed.

Treatment often involves from one to three visits. During treatment, your general dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in problems of the pulp) removes the diseased pulp. The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed.

NIGHT GUARDS

Do you clench or grind your teeth at night?  A night guard may be your answer!

A night guard is a retainer-like plastic appliance that can be worn on either the top or the bottom row of teeth. It protects the teeth from the pressure of clenching and grinding by relaxing the muscle responsible for bringing the upper and lower teeth together.

A night guard can be a simple, affordable solution for protecting your teeth and jaws from the damaging effects of nighttime clenching and grinding by helping to relax the muscles in the jaw.  Once we determine that you’re a good candidate for a night guard, we will create one that’s custom-made for your mouth, and you can rest soundly again.

TOOTH EXTRACTION

We always make every effort to treat your teeth and remedy any dental malady; unfortunately, in some cases damage to teeth is in so advanced a stage that is may be necessary to extract the tooth in order to maintain dental health.

If a tooth is broken, cracked or extensively decayed it may be necessary to remove it. Likewise, a tooth that is associated with advanced stages of periodontal disease should be removed, as well as teeth that are poorly positioned or non-functional.

INLAYS & ONLAYS

Inlays or onlays can become necessary to restore the cusp, or chewing surface, of decayed or fractured teeth. Usually made from gold or porcelain, inlays are used for minor restorations within the remaining tooth structure; onlays are used for more advanced decay and cover a greater restored area.

An inlay/onlay procedure is done in two parts:

  1. During the first session, the decayed area will be removed, the tooth will be thoroughly cleaned, and the exposed pulp area is covered with filler. At this session, a mold will be taken of the tooth to create an exact fit, which will prevent further decay or fracture.
  2. When you return for the next session, we will have ready the inlay/onlay made from your mold, and it will be secured to the tooth.

Gold traditionally has been used for inlays and onlays because of its ability to be molded onto the tooth in a way that ensures minimal chance of additional decay. However, advances are such that the same effect can be had with porcelain materials, which are custom-made to match the exact color of the existing tooth.

 

Call us today for an appointment!  571-287-7301